2014 Underwood Pinot Noir – Oregon Value

If I was to ask you to name a Pinot Noir producing region, what comes to mind first? For most Pinot Noir fans, the most likely answer is Burgundy. And why not, its wines are considered to be among the world’s best, which however also puts them as some of the world’s most expensive wine.

Finding an inexpensive but good quality Pinot Noir from Burgundy can be quite the challenge. However, luckily for fans of the heartbreak grape, there are a number of other regions producing good quality inexpensive Pinot Noirs.

One of those regions just happens to be the Willamette Valley in Oregon and like Burgundy, the valley is almost exclusively known for its Pinot Noir production. According to the 2015 Oregon Vineyard and Winey Census report, the valley accounts for 82% of the Pinot Noir production within Oregon, with 14,417 acres planted. The next closest grape in terms of planting was Pinot Gris at 2,463 acres.

However, there are noticeable differences between the two regions, most notably is the fact that Pinot Noirs from the Willamette valley tend to be somewhat more fruit forward than their Burgundy counterparts. This is most likely due to the different soil conditions between the two regions and the differences in climate.

Now when I mentioned other regions making inexpensive Pinot Noirs, I didn’t mean to indicate that wines coming out the Willamette Valley are necessarily cheap, because they are not. A good quality Oregon Pinot Noir is most likely going to run you $35 – $50, which may seem steep to a lot of folks. However, when compared to a Grand Cru Burgundy, which can start at $50 you can see where an Oregon Pinot Noir might be considered quite the value.

Given what I know about Oregon Pinot Noir, I tend to be skeptical when I see them for less than $25/bottle. So when I first tasted the 2014 Underwood Pinot Noir, I was quite impressed by the character shown in this wine, especially at a $20 price point.

Underwood 2014 Pinot Noir
Oregon – 2014 Underwood Pinot Noir

Right off the bat, I picked some intense notes of cherry and raspberry on the nose, along with a slight floral  note in the background. In comparison to other Pinot Noirs, I found the aromas for this wine to be quite a bit more pronounced and up front. In the glass, the wine showed a clear, pale, ruby color.

Underwood 2014 Pinot Noir in a glass

I found this to have a slightly more structured body than a lot of other Pinot Noirs, there seemed to be a slightly more tannic presence along with a finish that just seemed to linger longer than usual. There was also delightful acidity to the wine that helped to give it that slight boost in the body.

On the palate flavors of black cherry and cranberry coupled with vegetable notes. Interesting note on the flavor of the wine, while writing up my tasting notes, I happened to read the back of the wine label that highlighted “cola” as one of the predominate notes of this wine. As soon as I read cola, that was all I could taste and think of.

Back of the label
2014 Notes: Cherry, Blackberry, Cola

I was very pleasantly surprised by this wine, it showed much more complexity than I was expecting especially at its $20 price point. Perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised after reading up on the history of the winery. According to the wineries website, the winemaker Ryan Harms, set out to make a Pinot Noir that was accessible but not expensive.

A good indication of this desire is shown in the wineries newest offering, their Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Rose, and sparkling wine in a can. I’ve yet to try the Pinot Noir in a can but the word from friends and associates is that it’s pretty good and shows very similar to the Pinot in the bottle.

At the end of the day I can confidently say that if your hunting for a good quality value Pinot Noir, I don’t think you can go wrong with the Underwood Pinot Noir.

Cheers,

LB

Traversing the Okanagan Valley: Okanagan Falls

So far on our trip, we had toured the Black Sage and Naramata Bench, and now we were off to the Okanagan Falls region.

Okanagan Falls, or OK Falls as it’s also locally known, is a small community approximately 20 km south of Penticton that sits on the southern tip of Skaha lake. Highway 97 runs right through the middle of the town so unless you know about them or see the signs pointing them out; it’s entirely possible to miss the wineries that call the region home.

Similar to the other regions in the valley, this area also experiences long hot summer days with cool evenings. One difference is a somewhat higher elevation than the other regions. As a result, cool climate varietals such as Riesling and Gewurztraminer tend to do very well in the area.

Our first stop of the day was a winery that came highly recommended to me for its Rieslings, Synchromesh Wines.

Synchromesh Wines

Synchromesh Wines

 

When a winery receives 3 separate recommendations you pay attention. As was the case for Synchromesh Wines, I got 3 recommendations from separate individuals, telling me that this was winery worth visiting.

Turns out, our visit almost didn’t happen. Winery visits at that time were by appointment only and I had every attention of making one, however, it had slipped my mind. So when I casually mentioned visiting the winery on twitter, the winemaker responded with a reminder that visits were by appointment only. Luckily, I was able to make my appointment and get our tasting in.

I felt almost like a VIP during our tasting, it was just me, my wife and Alan from Synchromesh. I took it as a good sign that they were sold out of several of their wines the day we visited, but still managed to taste the 2015 ‘Drier’ Riesling, the 2015 Riesling, and the 2014 ‘Cachola Family Farms’ Cabernet Franc.

I was absolutely blown away by their Rieslings. Both of them had great acidity that made the wines refreshing and vibrant. The 2015 ‘Drier’ riesling had notes of green apple and lemon zest, and just a hint of peach on the tongue. The 2015 riesling also brought green apple notes and a hint of mango. That little hint of mango brough just a little more sweetness to it.

I can’t say enough of these wines; they were just simply crazy good. But now it was time for some lunch, so we were off to the Smoke & Oak Bistro at Wild Goose Vineyards for some BBQ.

Wild Goose Vineyards

WildGoose Vineyards

I was aware of Wild Goose Vineyards by name only, up to this point I had never had the chance to try their wines. The day before someone had mentioned that if we liked BBQ, we really should check out the Smoke & Oak Bistro at the winery.

We thought a BBQ lunch sounded like a great idea so here we were. Being about 10 minutes early for our reservation gave us a chance to sample some wines at the tasting bar.

It was quick tasting but a couple of real interesting wines, the 2013 Red Horizon Meritage, 2015 Autumn Gold, and the 2015 God’s Mountain Riesling.

The Meritage had an almost smoky texture to it, not a lot of fruit flavor, but plenty of earthiness to it. The Autumn Gold is a blend and I personally found it to be on the sweet side, but with lots of tropical fruit flavors.

The God’s Mountain Riesling was my favourite of the three wines. It had a very nice crispness to it with excellent notes of green apple, papaya, and lemon zest coupled with refreshing acidity.

Lunch at the Bistro was amazing and I would highly recommend it to anyone traveling through the area. Sitting outside on the patio allowed us to enjoy our lunch while gazing out among the vines. Be warned; bring an appetite, as the portions are not for the faint of heart.

The view from the patio
The view from our table at The Smoke & Oak bistro!

We packed ourselves and our leftovers into the car and headed off to Noble Ridge Vineyards, our next stop.

Noble Ridge Vineyards

Noble Ridge Vineyard & Winery

Pulling up to Noble Ridge, you quickly get an idea on how they chose their name. The tasting room sits on top of a ridge that looks down into a long reaching valley and ultimately Vaseux Lake. The view is breathtaking, and you can’t help but picture yourself with a glass of wine watching as the sun sets behind the hills in the background.

On the day of our visit, the winery was having an event featuring local artists. Strolling through the terrace at the back of the winery, we got a chance to mingle and chat with various artists as they worked on their  projects.

We started our tasting with their 2011 “The One” sparkling wine, which I found quite good. It had a nice acidic balance with a citrusy flavour and a freshly baked bread aroma.

The highlights of the tasting were the 2013 Estate Meritage and the 2015 Mingle. The Meritage is a blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and Cabernet Franc. A richly dark burgundy color leads into a luscious mouth feel with firm but not overpowering tannins. On the nose a really earthy aroma of tobacco and cedar with black cherry and coffee flavours. Definitely, a wine to be enjoyed with food.

The 2015 Mingle is a blend of Chardonnay, Gewurztraminer, Pinot Grigio, and Pinot Noir. This was very interesting wine, with a very strong aroma of honey and citrus on the nose. Given the strong honey aroma, I was expecting the wine to be sweet, but instead, I found it to be quite earthy. In terms of flavour, apple and peach were quite easy to distinguish but given the Pinot Noir addition, there was just a slight hint of strawberry in the background.

We finished up our tasting and headed off to our next stop, Liquidity Wine.

Liquidity Wines Ltd. 

Liquidity Wines

We pulled up to the tasting room and Liquidity and immediately were in awe of the building housing their tasting room and bistro. It had this great modern look to it, clean sharp lines, with wood beams and a concrete retaining wall.

One of the features of Liquidity is its relationship with art. The first evidence of this is a large sphere made out of old growth wood reclaimed from trees that fell during a storm years earlier. Scattered throughout the tasting and the bistro were several stunning works of art from local artists.

My favourite piece was an abstract one that from a distance looked like random streaks of paint, however upon closer examination turned out to be to be strips of old comics glued onto a canvas.

We found a spot at the bar and started our tasting. We started with the 2015 Riesling, moved into the 2015 Viognier and then the 2015 Rose. All of which were excellent, very lively with good acidity and fruit flavours.

From the whites we moved onto the reds, starting with the 2015 Pinot Noir Estate. A very clean and elegant body with just a slight hint of tannins. Aromas of raspberry and cedar coupled with cherry and vanilla flavours.

From there I moved to the 2014 Pinot Noir Reserve. It also showed a very elegant, smooth body with a slightly more tannic presence and more weight to it. The aroma of chocolate and cherry were very pronounced, with an undertone of earthiness. The chocolate and cherry note also carried over to the flavours, along with a just a slight hint of smokiness.

Then I was given the opportunity to try their 2014 Equity Pinot Noir, which is a small batch wine made with grapes from their premium blocks.

This was a very full-bodied Pinot Noir, with upfront aromas of black tea and violets, and just a faint aroma of strawberry in the background. Much more noticeable tannins provided a real depth and a silky feel to the wine. A real whirlwind of flavours, including vanilla, black cherry, black liquorice, cinnamon.

The young lady working the tasting counter said it reminded her of Black Forrest cake, and as soon as she said it, I realized that was the best description of this wine.

End of the Day!

I realize it sounds funny but we were done. I’m not complaining but it was hot out, there wasn’t a cloud in the sky and there was no breeze whatsoever. We had a couple other wineries we were thinking of visiting, but we decided to scrap it and go find a pool.

That being said I really enjoyed our time touring through Okanagan Falls. It was very relaxing, with a nice easy pace to it. The wines in this area were just excellent and I can’t say enough about the service.

I was very impressed with the time and attention that Alan at Liquidity Wines gave to us. He took pride in describing their farming methods and even took us to visit with the Pygmy goats he was raising.

Pygmy Goast at Synchromesh Winery

While this region doesn’t quite receive the same recognition as Naramata or Oliver,I find OK Falls wine just as good as the wineries in the other 2 other regions.

Cheers,

LB

Traversing the Okanagan Valley: Naramata Bench

So far in our trip, we had spent a day exploring the town of Penticton and touring wineries along the Black Sage Bench (see: Traversing the Okanagan Valley: Black Sage Bench).

The next region we were off to explore was the Naramata Bench. It’s a 14 km stretch of land set in amongst rolling hills and overlooking the Okanagan Lake and sits on top of sandy cliffs that run along the lake shore.

Like the Black Sage Bench, the Naramata Bench also enjoys long daylight hours and warm weather during the summer with daytime temperatures reaching 40° C at times. This area also benefits from long frost free autumns as a result of its close proximity to the Okanagan Lake and it’s sloping hills. Common varietals in this area are Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Viognier, and Pinot Blanc.

It’s located just east of Penticton and it’s quite a visitor friendly region to visit. A short 5 min drive out of town puts you on the Naramata Bench road and literally puts you into the region. As you drive along the road simply keep an eye out for the wine route signs pointing out where each winery can be located.

On this day we had decided that our first stop was going to be Hillside Winery & Bistro.

Hillside Winery & Bistro

Hillside Winery & Bistro

 

I first came across Hillside wines almost by accident. While shopping at a small local wine shop one day I came across their wines which happened to be on sale. The shop didn’t have the wine I was looking for so I decided to take a chance on this “new” wine.

Turned out that I’m glad I took that chance as Hillside quickly became one of our regular BC wines. So we were quite excited to have the opportunity to visit the winery.

One of the interesting points I found out about the winery is that its unique design allows it to ferment and age their wine in smaller batches. This allows them to maintain the characteristics and quality of the grapes from each vineyard throughout production.

For our tasting, we had the opportunity to run through the full gauntlet of wines they offer. We started off with the Pinot Gris, then Viognier, Gewürztraminer, and finished off with their Muscat Ottonel. All the whites showed very well but the Gewürztraminer especially stood out. Well structured with great acidity and notes of green apple, lemon peel, and pineapple.

Moving into the reds we tried their Syrah, Cab Franc, Pinot Noir, Gamay Noir and the Mosaic (a Bordeaux-style blend). As was the case with the whites, all the reds showed well but I was really taken with the Cab Franc and the Gamay Noir. The Gamay Noir, in particular, showed very well. Hints of pepper, tobacco, blackberry, and raspberry, coupled with a nice tannic mouthfeel and surprising acidity.

After a quick lunch at the Bistro, we were off to our next stop Kettle Valley Winery.

Kettle Valley Winery

Kettle Valley Winery

It will come as no surprise that the winery is in fact named after the Kettle Valley Railway which operated in Naramata in the first half of the 1900’s. The railway was well known for a dedication to excellence and the winery strives to follow that tradition hence the name.

Looking at the history of the winery it was interesting to note that it one of the first three wineries to open in the region. In that time Kettle Valley has stayed true to its roots, staying a small produce with more focus on quality instead of quantity.

A couple of years back I was able to pick up a couple bottles of their 2006 Pinot Noir, which were amazing, so I was quite interested to see what their current release was like. I tried the 2014 Pinot Noir, which had some very nice fruit flavours to it, notes of raspberry and cherry, but not a lot of structure. The body felt a little loose, definitely showing it’s young age. I think in about 5 years it will be a very good bottle of wine, once it’s had some time to tighten up and develop.

I picked up a bottle of the Pinot Noir, so I’ll let you know about in about 5 years time I’ll let you know if I’m right. As we finished up at Kettle Valley, we were on to our next destination..Joie Farm.

Joie Farm Winery

Joie Farm Winery

Joie Farm wasn’t on our radar at first, I reluctantly admit I didn’t know much about the winery. My wife, however, is a French immersion teacher and has a keen interest in anything French. So as soon as we saw the sign for the winery my wife immediately wanted to stop. It also helped that at that exact time someone was attaching a red bicycle to the sign which also caught our attention.

It’s funny how sometimes in life, spur of the moment decisions just work out. Joie Farm turned out to be one of our favourite stops of our entire trip. The winery has a very welcoming family feeling to it. Walking up to the tasting room you’ll notice scores of people sitting on blankets on the grass enjoying a glass of wine and a picnic lunch. We grabbed a couple of warm pretzels and made our way to the bar.

A large stone pizza over caught our attention, and we very impressed to see you could buy thin crust pizzas or warm pretzels. We grabbed a couple of warm pretzels and made our way to the bar.

Food & Wine

Our tasting was somewhat of a quick one, the winery was sold out of several of their releases. We did manage to secure a tasting of the 2014 PTG, 2015 Pinot Blanc, 2013 Riesling, and the 2014 Gamay Noir.

The 2015 Pinot Blanc was absolutely amazing, with a superb acidity that made it quite refreshing & bold notes of grapefruit and green apple. This was delicate enough to be a wine enjoyed on the patio but at the same time strong enough to stand up to food. I also found the 2014 PTG to be quite exceptional, with a nice medium body and tannin structure. Interestingly enough I found it to have notes of Raspberry both on the nose and in its flavour. Both wines were outstanding.

Once our tasting was complete and we had eaten our warm pretzel, it was time to head over to Lake Breeze.

Lake Breeze Vineyards 

Lake Breeze Vineyards

 

Lake Breeze was a winery that was recommended to me when I was researching where in the valley to visit.

Like so many wineries in the region, the first thing you notice when pulling up to the winery is the view. The winery overlooks Okanagan lake and standing on the terrace all you can see is the lake below as far as the eye can see.

Once you tear yourself away from the amazing view, it’s time to head into the absolutely gorgeous tasting room and try some wine. We tasted a fairly standard lineup, a Sauvignon Blanc, a Pinot Gris, a Pinot Blanc, a Merlot, a Pinot Noir, and a Rose. In addition, we also tasted a 2015 Ehrenfelser, which was I’m not familiar with. It was  very distinct, with strong notes of summer fruit like peach, nectarine, and apricot. A nice acidity to it, quite refreshing, but I think it could probably do with a couple of years of aging.

Also noteworthy was the 2013 Meritage, with big strong notes of ripe red fruit and a very nice tannic structure. It had a very nice mouthfeel to it, silky and smooth but bold enough that it would pair well with a rich savoury meal.

We were starting to run out steam by this point but we only had one more stop, Bench 1775 winery.

Bench 1775 Winery

Bench 1775

Earlier in the year my wife and I took in the annual Winefest event in town. One of the  wines we tried that day was their 2014 Sauvignon Blanc. We were so impressed we made a note that it should be one of the wineries we visited during our trip.

When we first walked into the tasting room I was a little nervous, there were two large parties in the tasting room at the time and I wasn’t entirely sure we would be able to find room. Thankfully, one of the parties was just leaving and we found some space at the bar.

Their white wine really stood out for me . The 2015 Semillon, in particular, was quite nice, with excellent citrus notes and a slight earthy tone to it. I imagined this being a wine that would pair extremely well with spicy food, the citrus cutting through the heat in the dish. I also quite liked the 2015 Viognier, which had a real nice fruit intensity to it along with nicely balanced acidity. This wine I could picture with Asian food, especially sushi.
By this point, we were just ready to call it a day and started to head home. However, we wound up making one more unexpected stop.

Red Rooster Winery

Red Rooster Winery

Funny story about Red Rooster is that we had it confused with Township 7 Vineyards, which we had visited in the spring of 2013. Since we “thought” we had already visited the winery we had no plans to stop. Driving by the wineries we soon realized our mistake, one quick U-turn later we were making one more stop.

Two things you’ll notice right away about the winery is the artwork scattered around the premise, and the large wooden doors leading into the tasting room. As we found out later the doors are made from wood reclaimed from the original Naramata train dock.

For this tasting I was all about the red wine, starting with the 2014 Pinot Noir, and then moving on to the 2014 Reserve Pinot Noir. Both were excellent, though I thought the Reserve had a slightly better-structured body, a bit more depth to it.

Turns out today was my lucky day, our server was impressed with my description of the reserve Pinot Noir and let me try their 2013 Golden Egg. A blend of Mourvèdre, Syrah, & Grenache, this was something else. Rich notes of green pepper, black pepper, tobacco, dark chocolate, and black currant. Not a wine to drink on its own, but something that would pair very well with food.

Golden Egg Wine @ Red Rooster

End of the Day!

With Red Rooster under our belt, we were officially done for the day and it was time to head home and put our feet up.

All in all we really enjoyed spending the day touring along the Bench. All the wineries are easy to get to and the people are super friendly and approachable. One thing I found is that it’s an area that doesn’t take itself too seriously. Each winery we visited we really felt that the message that was portrayed was to sit back, relax, enjoy a glass of wine, and enjoy.

The wines of the region also reflect this outlook, easy drinking and unpretentious. They are wines that would hold up to being cellared but can also be enjoyed right away. I look forward to enjoying what we brought home with us.

Cheers,

LB

Traversing the Okanagan Valley: Oliver (Black Sage Bench)

We spent the first day of our trip exploring Penticton, hanging out the beach, doing a little shopping, eating a little ice cream. It was a great way to unwind after a long drive, get settled, and prepare for our first day of wine touring.

In my previous post (Traversing the Okanagan Valley: The Beginning), I talked about the various sub-regions within the valley that you can go and visit. On our first day of wine touring we decided to head down towards Oliver, and visit what’s know as The Black Sage Bench.

This wine route runs along the east side of the valley and begins just south of Oliver. With its eastern location, grapes in this region benefit from the early morning sun and deep sandy soil tends to be common.

During the summer months, the valley experiences hot daytime temperatures but cool evenings allowing grapes to reach their optimal ripeness. Given these types of conditions, visitors can expect to see such common varietals such as Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Chardonnay, and Syrah.

For our first stop, we headed down towards the southern tip of the Bench to check out Burrowing Owl Estate Winery.

Burrowing Owl Estate Winery.

Burrowing Owl Winery along the Black Sage Bench

Burrowing Owl Estate Winery sits southeast of the town of Oliver near the northern edge of Osoyoos Lake. The winery sits on top of a southwest facing plateau and as such visitors are able to gaze down on the row upon rows of vines that stretch as far as the eye can see.

what a view

The winery took its name after Jim and Midge Wyse, the proprietors learned about the efforts of the Government to re-establish the Burrowing Owl after it was declared extinct in British Columbia.

We did a full tasting at the winery starting with the 2015 Sauvignon Blanc, which exhibited great aromas of fresh cut grass and peach. From there we moved into tasting the reds, starting with the 2013 Pinot Noir. Excellent aroma of raspberry on the nose coupled with fragrant strawberry, however, I feel like the wine could use a couple of years of aging to help strengthen the body.

We also got to taste the 2013 Merlot, the 2013 Cabernet Franc, and as somewhat of a treat the 2012 Meritage. Each of these wines showed great, excellent structure, taste profiles and aromas. Out of those three, I thought the Cabernet Franc really stood out, with a distance freshness and a crisp clean palate.

Black Hills Estate Winery

Black Hills Estate Winery

Next up in our tasting journey was Black Hills Estate Winery. In May, I had the opportunity to attend a winemaker’s tasting of Black Hills Estate wines at Vine Styles, a local wine store. I was so impressed with the wines we tasted that day that I marked this winery as a definite stop on our tour.

On this day we were partaking in their Portfolio tasting, a relaxed in-depth sampling of 3 whites and 3 red. For the whites, we were treated to their Viognier, Chardonnay, and Alias, while the red tasting was Syrah, 2014 Cellar Hand, and their flagship wine, the 2014 Nota Benne. Of the whites, the Viognier and the Alias were clear standouts. Both wines show great acidity, are crisp and clean without being overly sweet. The Alias was a real treat to taste as it’s normally only available to its club members.

In terms of the Reds, their Syrah is very well done, with excellent black pepper and herbal notes such as Thyme and Basil. However, the star of the show is the Nota Benne, Black Hills Estate flagship wine. It’s a diverse blend of 4 different Cabernet Sauvignon clones, 2 different Cabernet Franc clones, and 4 different Merlot clones. It’s produced by processing and aging each clone separately. After they are barrel aged, the clones are then blended together to give the wine a diverse taste and structure.

Blackhills Estate Tasting
Enjoying the portfolio tasting at Black Hills Estate winery.

The Nota Benne is incredibly complex but very well structured. The body has a medium weight to it but the tannin levels are very smooth making it an easy drinking wine. Ripe fruit qualities such as blackberry and plum, with notes of black pepper and green bell pepper.  It’s definitely a wine best served with food.

Platinum Bench Winery

After our tasting’s it was time for something to eat. While at Burrowing Owl, it was recommended to us to check out Platinum Bench winery’s fresh baked artisan bread.

As soon as you walk in the front door two things happen. One is you are instantly greeted by Wally, the winery greeter. Wally is a one of a kind greeter, with four legs, a wet nose and excitedly wagging tail.

The second thing that happens is you become aware of the delicious aroma of fresh baked bread. In addition to their award-winning wines, Platinum Bench has recently expanded to included artisan bread baked right on site by winery co-owner Fiona Duncan.

We grabbed a couple loaves of bread, an Asiago Cheese, a Gorgonzola & Fig, and some salami and took a seat out the deck outside. Both loaves were amazing, served warm, the crust was had a slightly chewy and crispy texture, while the inside was so soft and light. The view from the deck was breathtaking and I could have stayed there all day.

Stoneboat Vineyards

Stoneboat Vineyards

Stoneboat was recommended to me because of its focus on the Pinot grapes. Being the big fan of Pinot Noir that I am, this was a winery that I simply had to check out.

The winery is named after a “stone boat”, a flat sled that was originally used to carry stones. The name Stone Boat was chosen as a tribute to the individuals who originally worked to clear the vineyard of rocks in order to plant the vines.

The soil on all three of the vineyards that make up Stoneboat all tend to be quite rocky and calcareous, similar to the soil found in Burgundy, France, another well know Pinot region. The rocks found in the vineyard are put to good use, piled underneath of the vines they absorb the heat of the sun during the day and radiate that heat towards the vines during the cooler evenings.

We started our tasting with the Rose Brut, which was stunning. Bright, crisp, not overly sweet with a beautiful cherry aroma. We tasted a couple of the whites available, but what I really was excited for was the Pinot Noir. They were pouring their 2013 Pinot Noir, and I couldn’t wait to try it.

This was a very well structured wine, not your typical light styled body, it had actually had some weight to it. It has a slight acidity to it which I wasn’t expecting but found quite refreshing. A definite earthy aroma along with fresh flowers and cherry and intense flavours of strawberry and raspberry.

Stoneboat Pinot Noir

It was interesting to note that I was reading reviews online of Stoneboat’s Pinot Noir and a number of reviewers noted a mushroom or truffle flavour in the wine. I didn’t note that in the flavour of the wine but definitely found earthy notes in the aroma. I can’t wait to try this wine again in several years to see how the flavour profile has evolved.

 

Le Vieux Pin

Le Vieux Pin

Our last stop of the day was at Le Vieux Pin, sort of a newcomer to the region. The wineries name, translated as the “The Old Pine”, is derived from a single pine tree that sits out amongst the vines. It’s really quite a site to see, this single solitary pine tree seemingly rising up out of the vines.

Le Vieux Pin itself is a sister winery to La Stella, which is located further south in the valley down towards Osoyoos. At Le Vieux Pin, their focus is using traditional French winemaking traditions to produce wines that are in their words…”elegant and focused, with great intensity of fruit”.

For our tasting, we started off with the 2015 ‘Ava’, a blend of Viognier, Marsanne, & Roussane. A real nice acidic wine, with big fruit flavors such as peaches, nectarines, and melon rind. However, there was a lingering note of honey that provided just twinge of sweetness that seemed out of place. Up next was the 2015 Sauvignon Blanc, with notes of pineapple, kiwi, and tropical flowers. Very well structured, a balanced body with very little sweetness but great acidity gave this a real crispness and tartness to the wine.

From there we moved on to the Syrah. Unfortunately, my notetaking took a bit of a hit at this point and the only notes I had for this part of the tasting was for the 2009 Syrah. Which after tasting the wine I wasn’t all the upset about.

Le Vieux Pin Wines

This was deeply elegant, a smooth almost silky body, with just a slight tannic bite to it. One the nose ripe red fruit aromas coupled with savoury herbs, and bell pepper. On the tongue, there was a real bite of black pepper, but also black cherry, blueberry, and just a slight hint of minerality to it. This was a wine you could drink now but would only get better if you were to cellar for other 5-6 years.

End of the Day!

By this point we just about ready to call it a day. We had been to 4 wineries and tasted quite a bit of wine in that time. I had a cooler full of purchases I was eager to get home and put away, so we packed it in and headed back to Penticton.

In terms of exploring the Black Sage Bench and Oliver, we only scratched the surface. Given the number of wineries in the area, you could easily spend 3-4 days just visiting winery after winery.

The one common thing I took away from our tasting is that this area likes it big bold reds and high-intensity whites. When you read about the area and it talks about the Bourdeaux blends you really see what’s referring to.

Don’t get me wrong I’m not complaining, we tasted some absolutely fantastic wine, met some great people and took home some lasting memories.

Cheers,

LB

 

Review: Summerhill Pyramid Winery 2008 Zweigelt

Sitting around the kitchen table one night after dinner, my wife and I got to talking about entertaining and we realized it had been quite awhile since we’d had a get together at our place. We only half seriously started to think about what kind of event we could have.

At the same time my wife was looking at the calendar when she mentioned that Canada day was going to fall on a Friday this year. We thought that was perfect, what better way to celebrate Canada day and kick of the weekend then with a BBQ. Plans were quickly made and a little while later the invite went out.

The morning of the BBQ, I was getting things ready and I started to think about what to drink. We had gotten some beer, but what really was on my mind was wine. I had an idea, I wanted to do an all Canadian lineup in honor of Canada day. I pulled 2 whites, a Gewürztraminer from Red Rooster winery and a Pinot Gris from Dirty Laundry winery. For our red selection I choose a Cabernet Franc from Vineland Estates, a Solstice Pinot Noir from Arrowleaf Winery, and lastly a Zweigelt from Summerhill Pyramid winery.

Summer Lineup

Soon the BBQ was in full swing and it became very clear that I had made some very good selections in the wines I had chosen. The Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir were opened first as part of the appetizer portion of the evening and they were both very well received. The Solstice Pinot Noir from Arrowleaf showed incredibly well. Next up to go along with the main course was the Gewürztraminer and the Cab Franc. Again both very well received, with the Cab Franc from Vineland getting a number of compliments from Guests.

As the BBQ started to wind down we opened the Zweigelt from Summerhill Pyramid winery and that became sort of our late evening sit back, relax, and enjoy the evening wine. I’ll be honest I was a little nervous this was a 2008 vintage, and I had purchased it on a trip to the winery in 2012, so this was a wine that I had been cellaring for several years. As soon as we opened it though any fears I had quickly evaporated, the wine was in great shape and showing very well.

A little bit about Summerhill Pyramid Winery

The story of the winery is quite impressive in its own right. Stephen Cipes, the proprietor of the winery first came to the Okanagan Valley in 1986. His first reaction was that it would be a perfect spot to produce  sparkling wine. Since that day the Cipes family had built Summerhill Pyramid winery into a fully biodynamic winery, even receiving Demeter Biodynamic certification in 2012.

We visited Summerhill Pyramid winery in 2012 as part of road trip vacation, my wife and I had embarked on that year. There was two reasons why we choose to stop at Summerhill, one was their reputation for quality wine and organic farming, and two was their use of a pyramid for cellaring their wines. I had read several articles about their pyramid and wanted to check it out for myself. Unfortunately, we missed the pyramid tour on the day we went but were still very impressed with the winery and their wines.

On the day we visited there was several of their wines that stood out. Their Cipes Rose certainly spoke to their dedication to sparkling wines, and the Zweigelt was unlike anything I had tasted up to that point.

So I thought our Canada day BBQ was the perfect time to open up that 2008 Zweigelt that I had been hanging on to.

Summerhill Pyramid 2008 Zweigelt

Bottle

As I mentioned earlier the wine still showed very well, the body was well structured with a slightly cream texture. Very easy drinking style with medium low tannins, low alcohol level, and a refreshing acidity level.

The wine’s color was still quite vibrant, a rich burgundy, but the rim appeared to be quite a bit lighter. Which led me to wonder if the color was starting to lighten up given the age of the wine.

Glass

On the nose strong floral notes, such as lavender and violet. Also showing on the nose was a slight hint of cedar and tobacco. A real intense ripe red fruit comes through in the flavor of the wine. Some hints of raspberry and red plum.

Summerhill produces wine on their own terms based on their own philosophy. They believe in an organic and biodynamic philosophy. They put the same care into the production of their wine that they do into the land itself. That care shows in the quality of their wine and the 2008 Zweigelt is an example of that. It’s one I will definitely keep an eye out for in the future.

Cheers,

LB.

 

Cave Spring 2013 Pinot Noir

How do you answer the question “what’s your favourite wine”? Do you have a favourite? Is there one wine from a particular winery that absolutely stands out from all the rest? Perhaps there’s one wine that holds a sentimental place in your heart and for that reason you consider it your favourite?

For me there isn’t one specific bottle of wine,  but I do have a favourite grape. Hands down Pinot Noir is my favourite and is what I reach for whenever given the choice. So when we popped into one of our local wine shops one day and I saw a 2013 Cave Spring Pinot Noir sitting on the shelf I decided to give it a try. I had heard some good things about the winery in general and if they had a Pinot Noir then I was sold.

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Cave Spring 2013 Pinot Noir

When you think of wine in Canada you think of two regions, Niagara & the Okanagan, and while they are not the only wine producing regions they are the two best known. I live within easy travelling distance to the Okanagan, and as such visit there as often as I can. This allows me the opportunity to try as many as their wines as I can with relative ease. On the other hand I rarely get a chance to travel to the Niagara region and so I jump at the chance to try as many wines from there as a I can.

Cave Spring Vineyard is located in the Niagara Escarpment overlooking Lake Ontario in area known as the Beamsville Bench. Mineral rich soil consisting of limestone, shale, and sandstone provide an optimal balance required for growing grapes, and the natural slope of the vineyard allows for excess water to drain away while still retaining the required amount of moisture. The surrounding escarpment cliffs allow for temperate breezes that lengthen the growing season ensuring grapes ripen to their full extent.

The history of Cave Spring Vineyard goes back to the early 1920’s, when Giuseppe Pennachetti acquired the farmland where the vineyard is currently located. The vineyard began with the planting of European grape varietals, including Riesling and Chardonnay. The winery continues today under the guidance of Len Pennachetti and other family members. Cave Spring Vineyard is recognized as a foremost producer of Riesling within North America.

Cave Spring 2013 Pinot Noir

As mentioned above I’m always excited when presented with the chance to try a new Pinot Noir, and in the case of Cave Spring’s 2013 Pinot Noir, I was not disappointed.

At first the color of the wine appeared quite light and transparent, but after letting it sit for 10-15 min it had taken on a slightly darker hue. CSPN_003I would best describe the color as burgundy with purple tones and I immediately assumed a richer and heavier body then would be assumed for a Pinot Noir.

On first tasting of the wine I was taken aback to find the body much lighter then I had expected. It had the freshness and easy drinking body that I’ve come to enjoy in Pinot Noir but with a much darker color to it. It comes across as a young wine with very low tannins.

On the nose there was a definite earthiness to it, notes of minerality and cedar along with ripe cherries. As the initial chill of the wine wore off and the temperature increased, the earthiness aroma became less prominent and the aroma of ripe fruit became more pronounced.

On the palate I immediately picked up a strong note of black pepper and raspberry. Not as prominent as the black pepper, but I also noted a subtler note of something almost like chilli pepper. For a wine with a light easy body it definitely had a lot of structure and complexity to it.

Based on how well the Pinot Noir performed I can’t wait to try the Riesling.

Cheers,

LB

Notes: 

  • Winery: Cave Spring Vineyards
  • Vintage: 2013
  • Grape: Pinot Noir
  • Region: Niagara Escarpment
  • Country: Canada
  • Nose: Mineral, Cedar, Cherry
  • Taste: Black Pepper, Chilli Pepper, Raspberry
  • Purchased: CO-OP Liquor, Wine, & Spirits
  • Price: $18.99

Arrowleaf – 2013 Pinot Noir

Sitting in the office one day and I get a text message from a friend of mine. He and the wife are out in Kelowna for the fall wine festival and he’s raving about the Pinot Noir from Arrowleaf winery. Says that I will absolutely love it and asks if I want him to pick up a bottle for me. Being the Pinot Noir fan that I am it wasn’t a difficult decision to make, of course I wanted a bottle.

That was the first time I had their Pinot Noir and I was instantly hooked. It can be hard to find in stores here in Calgary so I’m always happy whenever I can get my hands on a couple of bottles.

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Arrowleaf Cellars is located on Okanagan Lake just north of Kelowna in British Columbia and consists of four separate vineyards.  It’s a family run winery, owned and operated by Joe and Margrit Zuppiger and their son Manuel. They proudly opened their doors for business in the spring of 2003.

They offer a blended line of wine called First Crush, but it’s their Arrowleaf and their Solstice line that really stand out. The Arrowleaf line is their varietal wine and includes Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer, Bacchus, and others. Their Solstice wines are made from the best grapes from a vintage and if they are not of a high enough quality they won’t make a Solstice vintage that year.

This time around I pulled a 2013 Pinot Noir from the cellar and it still doesn’t disappoint.AL_002 It has a well structured body with low tannins and a medium low acidity. I found it light enough to enjoy on its own but that it and stood up to food very well. On this night I paired it with a tossed salad and a chicken quesadilla. I noted a light ruby colour that was semi transparent.

Right away I noticed aromas of black cherry, raspberry and cedar. There was just a very slight floral hint on the nose but I wasn’t able to determine any particular aroma.

On the palate I found flavours of blackberry, tobacco, and just a slight note of liquorice. The first glass that I poured was nicely chilled (18º C) but as the wine warmed up the flavours started to mute slightly. This is definitely a wine best served with a slight chill to it.

I’m quite fond of this wine, for me it’s a very good Pinot Noir and is one I come back to again and again. I have a bottle of their Solstice Pinot Noir in the cellar and I’ve been saving that for the right time. I’m quite anxious to open that up and compare it to their Arrowleaf Pinot Noir.

Cheers,

LB

Notes: 

  • Winery: Arrowleaf Cellars
  • Vintage: 2013
  • Grape: Pinot Noir
  • Region: Okanagan Lake
  • Country: Canada
  • Nose: Black Cherry, Raspberry, Cedar, Floral hints
  • Taste: Blackberry, Tobacco, Liquorice
  • Purchased: Winery
  • Price: $18.00